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Acceptance of Commercially Available Wearable Activity Trackers Among Adults Aged Over 50 and With Chronic Illness: A Mixed-Methods Evaluation

Acceptance of Commercially Available Wearable Activity Trackers Among Adults Aged Over 50 and With Chronic Illness: A Mixed-Methods Evaluation

A total of 12 participants did not own a mobile phone or tablet, and they were lent one from the investigators or shared one with a friend or family member.

Kathryn Mercer, Lora Giangregorio, Eric Schneider, Parmit Chilana, Melissa Li, Kelly Grindrod

JMIR Mhealth Uhealth 2016;4(1):e7


Evaluating User Perceptions of Mobile Medication Management Applications With Older Adults: A Usability Study

Evaluating User Perceptions of Mobile Medication Management Applications With Older Adults: A Usability Study

A 2010 survey by the American Association of Retired Persons showed that 89% of individuals over age 50 use a mobile device with the most common device being a cellphone and 7% using a smartphone [22].

Kelly Anne Grindrod, Melissa Li, Allison Gates

JMIR Mhealth Uhealth 2014;2(1):e11


Behavior Change Techniques Present in Wearable Activity Trackers: A Critical Analysis

Behavior Change Techniques Present in Wearable Activity Trackers: A Critical Analysis

The team of researchers included a pharmacist (KG), a pharmacy student (ML), two systems design engineers (CB and LR), a kinesiologist (LG), and an information specialist (KM).

Kathryn Mercer, Melissa Li, Lora Giangregorio, Catherine Burns, Kelly Grindrod

JMIR Mhealth Uhealth 2016;4(2):e40


Using a Collaborative Research Approach to Develop an Interdisciplinary Research Agenda for the Study of Mobile Health Interventions for Older Adults

Using a Collaborative Research Approach to Develop an Interdisciplinary Research Agenda for the Study of Mobile Health Interventions for Older Adults

However, as of 2013, 59% of American adults aged 65 and over were online, 77% owned a mobile phone, 27% owned a tablet or e-reader, and 18% owned a smartphone [5]. Similar adoption rates have been seen in Canada [6], Britain [7], and Australia [8].

Kathryn Mercer, Neill Baskerville, Catherine M Burns, Feng Chang, Lora Giangregorio, Jill Tomasson Goodwin, Leila Sadat Rezai, Kelly Grindrod

JMIR Mhealth Uhealth 2015;3(1):e11


ClereMed: Lessons Learned From a Pilot Study of a Mobile Screening Tool to Identify and Support Adults Who Have Difficulty With Medication Labels

ClereMed: Lessons Learned From a Pilot Study of a Mobile Screening Tool to Identify and Support Adults Who Have Difficulty With Medication Labels

To guide content, development, and usability, we convened an advisory committee including a pharmacist and pharmacy professor (Kelly Grindrod); a representative from the Canadian National Institute for the Blind (Deborah Gold); an optometry professor and researcher

Kelly Anne Grindrod, Allison Gates, Lisa Dolovich, Roderick Slavcev, Rob Drimmie, Behzad Aghaei, Calvin Poon, Shamrozé Khan, Susan J Leat

JMIR Mhealth Uhealth 2014;2(3):e35


Characteristics of Adults Seeking Health Care Provider Support Facilitated by Mobile Technology: Secondary Data Analysis

Characteristics of Adults Seeking Health Care Provider Support Facilitated by Mobile Technology: Secondary Data Analysis

Health care support seeking from a provider was defined as Web-based communication with a doctor or other health care provider (included Web-based or combination of Web-based and conventional support) the last time the respondent had a health issue.

Kelly Bosak, Shin Hye Park

JMIR Hum Factors 2017;4(4):e33


Characteristics of Adults’ Use of Facebook and the Potential Impact on Health Behavior: Secondary Data Analysis

Characteristics of Adults’ Use of Facebook and the Potential Impact on Health Behavior: Secondary Data Analysis

Facebook used as a means for patients to communicate with other patients is a trend referred to as peer-to-peer health care [12].

Kelly Bosak, Shin Hye Park

Interact J Med Res 2018;7(1):e11