JMIR Research Protocols

Ongoing trials, grant proposals, and methods.

Editor-in-Chief:

Gunther Eysenbach, MD, MPH, FACMI


Impact Factor 2023

 

JMIR Research Protocols (ISSN 1929-0748) is a unique Pubmed- and (new!) Scopus-indexed journal, publishing peer-reviewed, openly accessible research ideas and grant proposals, study and trial protocols, reports of ongoing research, current methods and approaches, and preliminary results from pilot studies or formative research informing the design of medical and health-related research and technology innovations.

While the original focus was on eHealth studies, JMIR Res Protoc now publishes protocols and grant proposals in all areas of medicine, and their peer-review reports, if available (preliminary results from pilot studies, early results, and formative research should now be published in JMIR Formative Research).

While the original focus was on the design of medical and health-related research and technology innovations, JRP publishes research protocols, proposals, feasibility studies, methods and early results in all areas of medical and health research.

JMIR Res Protoc is fully open access, with full-text articles deposited in PubMed Central.

Publishing research protocols, grant proposals, pilot/feasibility studies and early reports of ongoing and planned work encourages collaboration and early feedback, and reduces duplication of effort.

JMIR Res Protoc is compatible with the concept of "Registered Reports" and since May 2018, published protocols receive a Registered Report Identifier (What is a Registered Report Identifier?) and acceptance of the subsequent results paper is "in principle" guaranteed in any JMIR journal and partner journals - see What is a Registered Report?

JMIR Res Protoc will be a valuable resource for researchers who want to learn about current research methodologies and how to write a winning grant proposal.

JMIR Res Protoc creates an early scientific record for researchers who have developed novel methodologies, software, innovations or elaborate protocols.

JMIR Res Protoc provides a "dry-run" for peer-review of the final results paper, and allows feedback/critique of the methods, often while they still can be fixed.

JMIR Res Protoc faciliates subsequent publication of results demonstrating that the methodology has already been reviewed, and reduces the effort of writing up the results, as the protocol can be easily referenced.

JMIR Res Protoc demonstrates to reviewers of subsequent results papers that authors followed and adhered to carefully developed and described a-priori methods.

Studies whose protocols or grant proposals have been accepted in JMIR Res Protoc are "in principle accepted" for subsequent publication of results in other JMIR journals as long as authors adhere to their original protocol - regardless of study results (even if they are negative), reducing publication bias in medicine.

Authors publishing their protocols in JMIR Res Protoc will receive a 20% discount on the article processing fee if they publish their results in another journal of the JMIR journal family (for example, JMIR for ehealth studies, i-JMR for others).

JMIR Res Protoc is also a unique crowdfunding platform, allowing backers to crowdfund carefully peer-reviewed projects that are not junk-science, and giving researchers additional small funding to conduct and publish their research results. Each article is published with a crowdfunding widget, allowing readers to make nominal donations to the project, which benefit the authors (currently in beta).

Need more reasons? Read the Knowledge Base article on "Why should I publish my protocol/grant proposal"!

 

Recent Articles

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Non-Randomized Studies (funded, non-eHealth)

Accidental awareness during general anesthesia (AAGA) is defined as an unexpected awareness of the patient during general anesthesia. This phenomenon occurs in 1%-2% of high-risk practice patients and can cause physical suffering and psychological after-effects, called posttraumatic stress disorder. In fact, no monitoring techniques are satisfactory enough to effectively prevent AAGA; therefore, new alternatives are needed. Because the first reflex for a patient during an AAGA is to move, but cannot do so because of the neuromuscular blockers, we believe that it is possible to design a brain-computer interface (BCI) based on the detection of movement intention to warn the anesthetist. To do this, we propose to describe and detect the changes in terms of motor cortex oscillations during general anesthesia with propofol, while a median nerve stimulation is performed. We believe that our results could enable the design of a BCI based on median nerve stimulation, which could prevent AAGA.

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RCTs - Protocols/Proposals (eHealth)

Despite efforts, the UK death rate from asthma is the highest in Europe, and 65% of people with asthma in the United Kingdom do not receive the professional care they are entitled to. Experts have recommended the use of digital innovations to help address the issues of poor outcomes and lack of care access. An automated SMS text messaging–based conversational agent (ie, chatbot) created to provide access to asthma support in a familiar format via a mobile phone has the potential to help people with asthma across demographics and at scale. Such a chatbot could help improve the accuracy of self-assessed risk, improve asthma self-management, increase access to professional care, and ultimately reduce asthma attacks and emergencies.

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RCTs - Protocols/Proposals (eHealth)

In the last decade, alcohol consumption among middle-aged women (40-65 years old) in Australia increased, despite declines in overall population consumption. Web-based, brief interventions are promising for reducing alcohol consumption, with efficacy shown in a wide range of populations. However, no published interventions have been designed specifically for and tested with middle-aged women.

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Non-Randomized Study Protocols and Methods (Non-eHealth)

Road traffic injuries (RTIs) are a leading cause of death and unintentional injuries globally. They claim 1.35 million lives and produce up to 50 million injuries each year, causing a major drain on health systems. Despite this high burden, there is a lack of robust data on the long-term consequences of RTIs, specifically the level of disability experienced by many survivors and its impact on their everyday lives.

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Proposals (eHealth)

Early action by bystanders is particularly important for the survival of individuals in need of emergency care, especially those experiencing a cardiac arrest or an airway obstruction. However, only a few bystanders are willing to perform cardiopulmonary resuscitation. The use of a live video during emergency calls appears to have a positive effect on the number of cardiopulmonary resuscitations performed by bystanders.

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NIH funded proposals with peer-review reports (USA)

Firearm safety among individuals with Alzheimer disease and related dementias (ADRD) is an underdiscussed and underresearched concern in the United States, especially given the growing population of community-dwelling adults with ADRD. The “Safety in Dementia” (SiD) web-based decision aid was developed to support caregivers in addressing firearm access; the efficacy of SiD is unknown.

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Non-randomized Protocols and Methods (ehealth)

Geriatric malnutrition in hospitals is common and can be affected by many things, including poor satisfaction toward hospital foodservice. Hospital foodservice plays an important role in a patient’s recovery process by providing adequate nutrients. On top of that, patients’ foodservice satisfaction can easily be afflicted by the quality of food served and the overall foodservice experience. Furthermore, malnutrition can occur from poor foodservice quality, especially among geriatric patients.

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Non-randomized Protocols and Methods (ehealth)

The COVID-19 pandemic has disrupted the health care system, limiting health care resources such as the availability of health care professionals, patient monitoring, contact tracing, and continuous surveillance. As a result of this significant burden, digital tools have become an important asset in increasing the efficiency of patient care delivery. Digital tools can help support health care institutions by tracking transmission of the virus, aiding in the screening process, and providing telemedicine support. However, digital health tools face challenges associated with barriers to accessibility, efficiency, and privacy-related ethical issues.

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Non-Randomized Study Protocols and Methods (Non-eHealth)

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder, with its currently approved drugs, including riluzole and edaravone, showing limited therapeutic effects. Therefore, safe and effective drugs are urgently necessary. EPI-589 is an orally available, small-molecule, novel redox-active agent characterized by highly potent protective effects against oxidative stress with high blood-brain barrier permeability. Given the apparent oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction involvement in the pathogenesis of ALS, EPI-589 may hold promise as a therapeutic agent.

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RCTs - Protocols/Proposals (non-eHealth)

Cisgender women in Kenya are at elevated risk of HIV acquisition during pregnancy and post partum. Acute HIV infection during pregnancy and breastfeeding accounts for approximately one-third of all vertical HIV transmissions. The World Health Organization recommends offering oral tenofovir-based pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) to pregnant and postpartum women who are HIV negative but at substantial and ongoing risk for HIV acquisition. PrEP delivery for pregnant and postpartum women is expanding within routine maternal child health clinics in Kenya. However, approximately half of pregnant women discontinue PrEP within 30 days of initiation. Therefore, it is crucial to develop PrEP adherence strategies that enhance support for adherence when peripartum events and health issues pose challenges to sustaining PrEP adherence.

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Non-randomized Protocols and Methods (ehealth)

Spinal metastases of lung cancer (SMLC) usually have a high degree of malignancy and require multimodality treatment. Patients with SMLC who experience clinical symptoms (eg, local pain, emerging or potential spinal instability, and progressive neurological dysfunction) require surgical treatment. However, there are discrepancies in the comparison of outcomes between surgical treatment and nonsurgical treatment.

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RCTs - Protocols/Proposals (funded, already peer-reviewed, eHealth)

The use of e-cigarettes, or vaping, has increased exponentially in the past decade, particularly among youth. Emerging evidence indicates growing nicotine dependence among youth, revealing historically higher rates of dependence among current e-cigarette users compared to rates seen in earlier research. Despite the urgent need for youth vaping cessation interventions, there is limited knowledge about the process of vaping cessation, and few evidence-based interventions are available to young people seeking support. A notable literature review on vaping cessation resources for young people recommended technology-based interventions, such as smartphone apps and SMS text messaging services, as a promising area of vaping cessation research and intervention development.

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Preprints Open for Peer-Review

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