JMIR Research Protocols

Ongoing trials, grant proposals, and methods.

Editor-in-Chief:

Amaryllis Mavragani (Acting Editor-in-Chief), Scientific Editor at JMIR Publications, Canada


Impact Factor 1.7

 JMIR Research Protocols  (JRP, ISSN 1929-0748, Impact Factor: 1.7) is a unique Pubmed- and (new!) Scopus-indexed journal, publishing peer-reviewed, openly accessible research ideas and grant proposals, study and trial protocols, reports of ongoing research, current methods and approaches, and preliminary results from pilot studies or formative research informing the design of medical and health-related research and technology innovations.

In 2023, JMIR Research Protocols received an inaugural Journal Impact Factor™ of 1.7 (Source: Journal Citation Reports™ from Clarivate, 2023).

While the original focus was on eHealth studies, JMIR Res Protoc now publishes protocols and grant proposals in all areas of medicine, and their peer-review reports, if available (preliminary results from pilot studies, early results, and formative research should now be published in JMIR Formative Research).

While the original focus was on the design of medical and health-related research and technology innovations, JRP publishes research protocols, proposals, feasibility studies, methods and early results in all areas of medical and health research.

JMIR Res Protoc is fully open access, with full-text articles deposited in PubMed Central.

Publishing research protocols, grant proposals, pilot/feasibility studies and early reports of ongoing and planned work encourages collaboration and early feedback, and reduces duplication of effort.

JMIR Res Protoc is compatible with the concept of "Registered Reports" and since May 2018, published protocols receive a Registered Report Identifier (What is a Registered Report Identifier?) and acceptance of the subsequent results paper is "in principle" guaranteed in any JMIR journal and partner journals - see What is a Registered Report?

JMIR Res Protoc will be a valuable resource for researchers who want to learn about current research methodologies and how to write a winning grant proposal.

JMIR Res Protoc creates an early scientific record for researchers who have developed novel methodologies, software, innovations or elaborate protocols.

JMIR Res Protoc provides a "dry-run" for peer-review of the final results paper, and allows feedback/critique of the methods, often while they still can be fixed.

JMIR Res Protoc faciliates subsequent publication of results demonstrating that the methodology has already been reviewed, and reduces the effort of writing up the results, as the protocol can be easily referenced.

JMIR Res Protoc demonstrates to reviewers of subsequent results papers that authors followed and adhered to carefully developed and described a-priori methods.

Studies whose protocols or grant proposals have been accepted in JMIR Res Protoc are "in principle accepted" for subsequent publication of results in other JMIR journals as long as authors adhere to their original protocol - regardless of study results (even if they are negative), reducing publication bias in medicine.

Authors publishing their protocols in JMIR Res Protoc will receive a 20% discount on the article processing fee if they publish their results in another journal of the JMIR journal family (for example, JMIR for ehealth studies, i-JMR for others).

Need more reasons? Read the Knowledge Base article on "Why should I publish my protocol/grant proposal"!

 

Recent Articles

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RCTs - Protocols/Proposals (non-eHealth)

Rituximab, an anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody, can cause infusion reactions (IRs), especially during the initial rituximab infusion therapy. Generally, patients are administered a histamine H1-receptor antagonist before the rituximab infusion, along with an antipyretic analgesic, to prevent or reduce IRs. Multiple retrospective case-control studies indicate that the second generation of histamine H1-receptor antagonists might be more effective than the first generation in suppressing IRs caused by the rituximab infusion.

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RCTs - Protocols/Proposals (eHealth)

Many emerging adults (EAs) are prone to making unhealthy choices, which increase their risk of premature cancer morbidity and mortality. In the era of social media, rigorous research on interventions to promote health behaviors for cancer risk reduction among EAs delivered over social media is limited. Cancer prevention information and recommendations may reach EAs more effectively over social media than in settings such as health care, schools, and workplaces, particularly for EAs residing in rural areas.

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Non-randomized Protocols and Methods (ehealth)

Low back pain (LBP) was the fifth most common reason for an emergency department (ED) visit in 2020-2021 in Australia, with >145,000 presentations. A total of one-third of these patients were subsequently admitted to the hospital. The admitted patient care accounts for half of the total health care expenditure on LBP in Australia.

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Proposals (non-eHealth)

Antimicrobial stewardship programs attempting to optimize antibiotic therapy and clinical outcomes mainly focus on inpatient and outpatient settings. The lack of antimicrobial stewardship program studies in the emergency department (ED) represents a gap in tackling the problem of antimicrobial resistance as EDs treat a substantial number of upper respiratory tract infection cases throughout the year.

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Non-Randomized Study Protocols and Methods (Non-eHealth)

Vulnerable older adults have a high risk of morbidity and mortality. Regular physical activity (PA) can have a positive effect on the health and health-related behavior of this specific target group. However, evidence of the impact and feasibility of community-based PA promotion interventions for vulnerable older adults is still limited.

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Non-Randomized Studies (funded, eHealth)

Nursing leadership teams at the point of care (POC), consisting of both formal and informal leaders, are regularly called upon to support the implementation of evidence-based practices (EBPs) in hospital units. However, current conceptualizations of effective leadership for successful implementation typically focus on the behaviors of individual leaders in managerial roles. Little is known about how multiple nursing leaders in formal and informal roles share implementation leadership (IL), representing an important knowledge gap.

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RCTs - Protocols/Proposals (eHealth)

Stunting and micronutrient deficiencies have persistently affected children in the Brazilian Amazon for decades. However, in recent years, a notable increase in childhood overweight prevalence has been observed, particularly in the context of heightened food insecurity exacerbated by the COVID-19 pandemic. Despite the limited number of effective solutions proposed to tackle this problem, digital interventions have shown great promise worldwide in preventing obesity and promoting healthy diets.

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RCTs - Protocols/Proposals (eHealth)

African American or Black (hereafter referred to as Black) adults who use cannabis use it more frequently and are more likely to meet criteria for cannabis use disorder (CUD) than both White and Hispanic or Latin individuals. Black adults may be more apt to use cannabis to cope with distress, which constitutes a false safety behavior (FSB; a behavior designed to reduce psychological distress in the short term). Although FSB engagement can perpetuate the cycle of high rates of CUD among Black individuals, limited work has applied an FSB elimination treatment approach to Black adults with CUD, and no previous work has evaluated FSB reduction or elimination in the context of a culturally tailored and highly accessible treatment developed for Black individuals.

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RCTs - Protocols/Proposals (eHealth)

HIV or sexually transmitted infections remain a significant public health concern in the United States, with adolescents affected disproportionately. Adolescents engage in HIV/STI risk behaviors, including drug use and condomless sex, which increase the risk for HIV/STIs. At-risk adolescents, many of whom are racial minorities, experience HIV/STI disparities. Although at-risk adolescents are disproportionately affected by HIV/STI risk behaviors and infections and although the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends routine HIV/STI testing for adolescents, relatively few adolescents report having ever been tested for HIV/STI. With expected increases in health clinic visits as a result of the Affordable Care Act combined with technological advances, health clinics and mobile health (mHealth), including apps, provide innovative contexts and tools to engage at-risk adolescents in HIV/STI prevention programs. Yet, there is a dearth of efficacious mHealth interventions in health clinics to prevent and reduce both condomless sex and drug use and increase HIV/STI testing for at-risk adolescents.

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RCTs - Protocols/Proposals (non-eHealth)

Fungal infections are now a great public health threat, especially in those with underlying risk factors such as neutropenia, diabetes, high-dose steroid treatment, cancer chemotherapy, prolonged intensive care unit stay, and so on, which can lead to mycoses with higher mortality rates. The rates of these infections have been steadily increasing over the past 2 decades due to the increasing population of patients who are immunocompromised. However, the data regarding the exact burden of such infection are still not available from India. Therefore, this registry was initiated to collate systematic data on invasive fungal infections (IFIs) across the country.

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Non-randomized Protocols and Methods (ehealth)

Patients with postmenopausal nonmetastatic estrogen receptor–positive breast cancer often experience a reduced quality of life after primary treatment. The disease and treatment trajectory consists of surgery followed by chemotherapy or radiation therapy. Upon this, maintenance hormone therapy with an aromatase inhibitor can result in several physical and psychosocial symptoms. Optimal symptom control during maintenance therapy is central to maintaining the patient’s quality of life.

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Systematic Review Protocols

Chatbots have the potential to increase people’s access to quality health care. However, the implementation of chatbot technology in the health care system is unclear due to the scarce analysis of publications on the adoption of chatbot in health and medical settings.

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Preprints Open for Peer-Review

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