JMIR Research Protocols

Ongoing trials, grant proposals, and methods

Editor-in-Chief:

Gunther Eysenbach, MD, MPH, FACMI


 

JMIR Research Protocols (ISSN 1929-0748) is a unique Pubmed- and (new!) Scopus-indexed journal, publishing peer-reviewed, openly accessible research ideas and grant proposals, study and trial protocols, reports of ongoing research, current methods and approaches, and preliminary results from pilot studies or formative research informing the design of medical and health-related research and technology innovations.

While the original focus was on eHealth studies, JMIR Res Protoc now publishes protocols and grant proposals in all areas of medicine, and their peer-review reports, if available (preliminary results from pilot studies, early results, and formative research should now be published in JMIR Formative Research).

While the original focus was on the design of medical and health-related research and technology innovations, JRP publishes research protocols, proposals, feasibility studies, methods and early results in all areas of medical and health research.

JMIR Res Protoc is fully open access, with full-text articles deposited in PubMed Central.

Publishing research protocols, grant proposals, pilot/feasibility studies and early reports of ongoing and planned work encourages collaboration and early feedback, and reduces duplication of effort.

JMIR Res Protoc is compatible with the concept of "Registered Reports" and since May 2018, published protocols receive a Registered Report Identifier (What is a Registered Report Identifier?) and acceptance of the subsequent results paper is "in principle" guaranteed in any JMIR journal and partner journals - see What is a Registered Report?

JMIR Res Protoc will be a valuable ressource for researchers who want to learn about current research methodologies and how to write a winning grant proposal.

JMIR Res Protoc creates an early scientific record for researchers who have developed novel methodologies, software, innovations or elaborate protocols.

JMIR Res Protoc provides a "dry-run" for peer-review of the final results paper, and allows feedback/critique of the methods, often while they still can be fixed.

JMIR Res Protoc faciliates subsequent publication of results demonstrating that the methodology has already been reviewed, and reduces the effort of writing up the results, as the protocol can be easily referenced.

JMIR Res Protoc demonstrates to reviewers of subsequent results papers that authors followed and adhered to carefully developed and described a-priori methods.

Studies whose protocols or grant proposals have been accepted in JMIR Res Protoc are "in principle accepted" for subsequent publication of results in other JMIR journals as long as authors adhere to their original protocol - regardless of study results (even if they are negative), reducing publication bias in medicine.

Authors publishing their protocols in JMIR Res Protoc will receive a 20% discount on the article processing fee if they publish their results in another journal of the JMIR journal family (for example, JMIR for ehealth studies, i-JMR for others).

JMIR Res Protoc is also a unique crowdfunding platform, allowing backers to crowdfund carefully peer-reviewed projects that are not junk-science, and giving researchers additional small funding to conduct and publish their research results. Each article is published with a crowdfunding widget, allowing readers to make nominal donations to the project, which benefit the authors (currently in beta).

Need more reasons? Read the Knowledge Base article on "Why should I publish my protocol/grant proposal"!

 

Recent Articles

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Systematic Review Protocols

Over 85% of active members of the Canadian Armed Forces have been exposed to potentially traumatic events linked to the development of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). At the time of transition to civilian life, as high as 1 in 8 veterans may be diagnosed with PTSD. Given the high prevalence of PTSD in military and veteran populations, the provision of effective treatment considering their unique challenges and experiences is critical for mental health support and the well-being of these populations.

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Non-randomized Protocols and Methods (ehealth)

Many people with psychosis experience difficulties in everyday social situations. Anxiety can make life challenging, leading to withdrawal. Cognitive therapy, using active in vivo learning, enables people to overcome fears. These treatments are not readily available to people with psychosis. Automated virtual reality (VR) therapy is a potential route to increase accessibility. The gameChange automated VR cognitive therapy is designed to help people overcome anxious avoidance and build confidence in everyday social situations. A virtual coach guides the person through the treatment. Understanding user experience is key to facilitating future implementation. Peer research methods, in which people with lived experience of the issues being studied are involved in collecting and analyzing data, may be useful in developing this understanding. This encourages researchers to draw on their lived experience to explore participant perspectives and co-create knowledge.

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Non-Randomized Study Protocols and Methods (Non-eHealth)

India has a massive noncommunicable disease (NCD) burden, at an enormous cost to the individual, family, society, and health system at large, despite which prevention and surveillance are relatively neglected. If diagnosed early and treated adequately, risk factors for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease would help decrease the mortality and morbidity burden. Surveillance for NCDs, creating awareness, positive lifestyle changes, and treatment are the proven measures known to prevent the progression of the disease. India is in a stage of rapid epidemiological transition, with the state of Kerala being at the forefront, pointing us towards likely disease burden and outcomes for the rest of the country in the future. A previous study done by the same investigators in a population of >100,000 revealed poor awareness, treatment of NCDs, and poor adherence to medicines in individuals with CVD.

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Non-randomized Protocols and Methods (ehealth)

Early childhood caries (ECC) is the most common chronic childhood disease, with nearly 1.8 billion new cases per year worldwide. ECC afflicts approximately 55% of low-income and minority US preschool children, resulting in harmful short- and long-term effects on health and quality of life. Clinical evidence shows that caries is reversible if detected and addressed in its early stages. However, many low-income US children often have poor access to pediatric dental services. In this underserved group, dental caries is often diagnosed at a late stage when extensive restorative treatment is needed. With more than 85% of lower-income Americans owning a smartphone, mobile health tools such as smartphone apps hold promise in achieving patient-driven early detection and risk control of ECC.

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Non-Randomized Studies (funded, eHealth)

Adolescents and young adults (AYAs) with cancer demonstrate suboptimal oral chemotherapy adherence, increasing their risk of cancer relapse. It is unclear how everyday time-varying contextual factors (eg, mood) affect their adherence, stalling the development of personalized mobile health (mHealth) interventions. Poor engagement is also a challenge across mHealth trials; an effective adherence intervention must be engaging to promote uptake.

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Non-randomized Protocols and Methods (ehealth)

Although short-term blood glucose levels and variability are thought to underlie diminished function and emotional well-being in people with type 1 diabetes (T1D), these relationships are poorly understood. The Function and Emotion in Everyday Life with T1D (FEEL-T1D) study focuses on investigating these short-term dynamic relationships among blood glucose levels, functional ability, and emotional well-being in adults with T1D.

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RCTs - Protocols/Proposals (non-eHealth)

Parkinson disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder associated with a broad spectrum of motor and nonmotor symptoms. Any proposed cure needs to address the many aspects of the disease. Stem cell therapy may have potential in this regard as indicated in recent preclinical and clinical studies.

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RCTs - Pilots/Feasibility Studies (non-eHealth)

Young people moving from adolescent secure inpatient units to adult care in the United Kingdom have multiple and complex needs and are more likely to experience poor transition outcomes. Poorly managed transitions can lead to enduring use and dependency on mental health services. However, there is a lack of knowledge about the feasibility of transitional care models.

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RCTs - Protocols/Proposals (non-eHealth)

Pancreatic cancer is associated with high mortality and its rates of detection are very low; as such, the disease is typically diagnosed at an advanced stage. A number of risk factors for pancreatic cancer have been reported and may be used to identify individuals at high risk for the development of this disease.

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RCTs - Protocols/Proposals (eHealth)

The number of solid organ transplants in Canada has increased 33% over the past decade. Hospital readmissions are common within the first year after transplant and are linked to increased morbidity and mortality. Nearly half of these admissions to the hospital appear to be preventable. Mobile health (mHealth) technologies hold promise to reduce admission to the hospital and improve patient outcomes, as they allow real-time monitoring and timely clinical intervention.

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Non-Randomized Studies (funded, non-eHealth)

Pediatric appendicitis accounts for an estimated 7% to 10% of abdominal pain cases in the emergency department (ED). The diagnosis is time-consuming, and the investigative process depends on physician assessment, resulting in delays in diagnosis and therapeutic management. The utility of an advanced nursing directive (AND) to expedite this process is unclear and needs further exploration.

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Non-Randomized Studies (funded, eHealth)

Suicide is the third leading cause of death among Black adults aged 18-35 years. Although men represent a majority of suicide deaths among Black adults, less is known regarding the extent to which unique cultural stressors, such as racism-related stress (eg, racial discrimination), are salient in exacerbating suicide risk among Black men. Moreover, few studies examine the daily influence of racism-related stressors on suicide outcomes using real-time smartphone-based approaches. Smartphone-based mobile health approaches using ecological momentary assessments (EMA) provide an opportunity to assess and characterize racism-related stressors as a culturally sensitive suicide risk factor among Black young adult men.

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Preprints Open for Peer-Review

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