JMIR Research Protocols

Ongoing trials, grant proposals, and methods

Editor-in-Chief:

Gunther Eysenbach, MD, MPH, FACMI


 

JMIR Research Protocols (ISSN 1929-0748) is a unique Pubmed- and (new!) Scopus-indexed journal, publishing peer-reviewed, openly accessible research ideas and grant proposals, study and trial protocols, reports of ongoing research, current methods and approaches, and preliminary results from pilot studies or formative research informing the design of medical and health-related research and technology innovations.

While the original focus was on eHealth studies, JMIR Res Protoc now publishes protocols and grant proposals in all areas of medicine, and their peer-review reports, if available (preliminary results from pilot studies, early results, and formative research should now be published in JMIR Formative Research).

While the original focus was on the design of medical and health-related research and technology innovations, JRP publishes research protocols, proposals, feasibility studies, methods and early results in all areas of medical and health research.

JMIR Res Protoc is fully open access, with full-text articles deposited in PubMed Central.

Publishing research protocols, grant proposals, pilot/feasibility studies and early reports of ongoing and planned work encourages collaboration and early feedback, and reduces duplication of effort.

JMIR Res Protoc is compatible with the concept of "Registered Reports" and since May 2018, published protocols receive a Registered Report Identifier (What is a Registered Report Identifier?) and acceptance of the subsequent results paper is "in principle" guaranteed in any JMIR journal and partner journals - see What is a Registered Report?

JMIR Res Protoc will be a valuable ressource for researchers who want to learn about current research methodologies and how to write a winning grant proposal.

JMIR Res Protoc creates an early scientific record for researchers who have developed novel methodologies, software, innovations or elaborate protocols.

JMIR Res Protoc provides a "dry-run" for peer-review of the final results paper, and allows feedback/critique of the methods, often while they still can be fixed.

JMIR Res Protoc faciliates subsequent publication of results demonstrating that the methodology has already been reviewed, and reduces the effort of writing up the results, as the protocol can be easily referenced.

JMIR Res Protoc demonstrates to reviewers of subsequent results papers that authors followed and adhered to carefully developed and described a-priori methods.

Studies whose protocols or grant proposals have been accepted in JMIR Res Protoc are "in principle accepted" for subsequent publication of results in other JMIR journals as long as authors adhere to their original protocol - regardless of study results (even if they are negative), reducing publication bias in medicine.

Authors publishing their protocols in JMIR Res Protoc will receive a 20% discount on the article processing fee if they publish their results in another journal of the JMIR journal family (for example, JMIR for ehealth studies, i-JMR for others).

JMIR Res Protoc is also a unique crowdfunding platform, allowing backers to crowdfund carefully peer-reviewed projects that are not junk-science, and giving researchers additional small funding to conduct and publish their research results. Each article is published with a crowdfunding widget, allowing readers to make nominal donations to the project, which benefit the authors (currently in beta).

Need more reasons? Read the Knowledge Base article on "Why should I publish my protocol/grant proposal"!

 

Recent Articles

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Systematic Review Protocols

The process of designing a digital health intervention (DHI)—also referred to as mobile health or eHealth—spans needs assessments, technical functionality and feasibility, user satisfaction, effectiveness, impact, and value. These interventions are causing a rapid evolution in the landscape of health care. Multiple studies have shown their propensity to extend both the quality and reach of interventions. However, failure to improve DHI design is linked to failed uptake and health outcomes. This dilemma is further conflicted by the colliding backdrops of the digital and health industries, both of which approach, understand, and involve end users differently in the framing of a DHI.

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Scoping Review Protocols

Chronic respiratory diseases are highly prevalent and compromise an individual’s ability to perform activities of daily living (ADLs) and participate in meaningful life roles. Pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) is a well-established intervention aimed at restoring an individual’s exercise capacity and improving their ability to complete their ADLs. Occupational therapists help individuals engage in meaningful “occupations,” improving their health and well-being. Given the concordance in the aims of PR and the occupational therapy (OT) scope of practice, occupational therapists appear to be well suited as key players in PR programs. However, the benefits of adding OT to PR programs have been sparsely reported in the literature and the role of OT in PR has never been synthesized or reported in national and international guidelines.

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Scoping Review Protocols

Ensuring women’s rights during childbirth care based on humanized and bioethical principles results in better quality of care and patient safety and provides positive childbirth experiences.

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Systematic Review Protocols

Tobacco control models are mathematical models predicting tobacco-related outcomes in defined populations. The policy simulation model is considered as a subcategory of tobacco control models simulating the potential outcomes of tobacco control policy options. However, we could not identify any existing tool specifically designed to assess the quality of tobacco control models.

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Non-Randomized Studies (funded, eHealth)

The COVID-19 pandemic and concomitant governmental responses have created the need for innovative and collaborative approaches to deliver services, especially for populations that have been inequitably affected. In Alberta, Canada, two novel approaches were created in Spring 2020 to remotely support patients with complex neurological conditions and rehabilitation needs. The first approach is a telehealth service that provides wayfinding and self-management advice to Albertans with physical concerns related to existing neurological or musculoskeletal conditions or post-COVID-19 recovery needs. The second approach is a webinar series aimed at supporting self-management and social connectedness of individuals living with spinal cord injury.

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RCTs - Protocols/Proposals (eHealth)

Traditional face-to-face training (FFT) for basic surgical skills is inaccessible and resource-intensive. Noninteractive computer-based learning is more economical but less educationally beneficial. Virtual classroom training (VCT) is a novel method that permits distanced interactive expert instruction. VCT may optimize resources and increase accessibility.

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RCTs - Protocols/Proposals (funded, already peer-reviewed, eHealth)

Public safety personnel have regular and often intense exposure to potentially traumatic events at work, especially workplace violence in the case of correctional workers. Subsequently, correctional workers are at higher risk of developing mental health problems such as posttraumatic stress disorder. Public safety personnel are up to 4 times more likely to experience suicidal ideation, suicidal attempts, and death by suicide compared to the general population. Despite this high prevalence, help-seeking behaviors from public safety personnel are low due to stigma and irregular work hours limiting access to care. Innovative treatments are needed to address these challenges.

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Non-randomized Protocols and Methods (ehealth)

Innovative analyses of cardiovascular (CV) risk markers and health behaviors linked to neighborhood stressors are essential to further elucidate the mechanisms by which adverse neighborhood social conditions lead to poor CV outcomes. We propose to objectively measure physical activity (PA), sedentary behavior, and neighborhood stress using accelerometers, GPS, and real-time perceived ecological momentary assessment via smartphone apps and to link these to biological measures in a sample of White and African American women in Washington, DC, neighborhoods.

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Systematic Review Protocols

The increase in the prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and its associated complications is burdensome to the South African health system. Understanding the role of comorbid diseases, such as periodontal disease (PD), and their effect on metabolic control in patients with DM in South Africa will raise awareness about the importance of periodontal interventions among patients with DM in South Africa.

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Scoping Review Protocols

Globally, the demands on dental educators continue to diversify and expand. Due to their importance and value, mentoring programs have been acknowledged as a means of recruiting, developing, and retaining academics in dental education.

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RCTs - Protocols/Proposals (eHealth)

New HIV infections in Indonesia continue to be concentrated among key populations, including female sex workers (FSWs). However, increasing HIV testing among this subpopulation remains a challenge, necessitating exploration into alternative testing modalities.

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Non-Randomized Study Protocols and Methods (Non-eHealth)

Clients with severe to profound intellectual disabilities (SPID) and challenging behavior (CB) and the professional caregivers that support them are vulnerable to high stress levels, which negatively impact their well-being and the quality of care. CB is thought to result from an increase in the intensity and frequency of clients’ stress experiences. In turn, staff members experience stress in dealing with this behavior, and stressed staff members might behave in ways that increase clients’ stress levels, contributing to the origin and maintenance of CB. Research into these dyadic interactions between clients and staff is scarce for people with SPID, especially in real-life situations. The barriers of studying stress in this population include clients’ difficulties in communicating stress experiences and the lack of an objective continuous measure of stress.

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Preprints Open for Peer-Review

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