JMIR Research Protocols

Ongoing trials, grant proposals, and methods.

Editor-in-Chief:

Gunther Eysenbach, MD, MPH, FACMI


Impact Factor 2023

 

JMIR Research Protocols (ISSN 1929-0748) is a unique Pubmed- and (new!) Scopus-indexed journal, publishing peer-reviewed, openly accessible research ideas and grant proposals, study and trial protocols, reports of ongoing research, current methods and approaches, and preliminary results from pilot studies or formative research informing the design of medical and health-related research and technology innovations.

While the original focus was on eHealth studies, JMIR Res Protoc now publishes protocols and grant proposals in all areas of medicine, and their peer-review reports, if available (preliminary results from pilot studies, early results, and formative research should now be published in JMIR Formative Research).

While the original focus was on the design of medical and health-related research and technology innovations, JRP publishes research protocols, proposals, feasibility studies, methods and early results in all areas of medical and health research.

JMIR Res Protoc is fully open access, with full-text articles deposited in PubMed Central.

Publishing research protocols, grant proposals, pilot/feasibility studies and early reports of ongoing and planned work encourages collaboration and early feedback, and reduces duplication of effort.

JMIR Res Protoc is compatible with the concept of "Registered Reports" and since May 2018, published protocols receive a Registered Report Identifier (What is a Registered Report Identifier?) and acceptance of the subsequent results paper is "in principle" guaranteed in any JMIR journal and partner journals - see What is a Registered Report?

JMIR Res Protoc will be a valuable resource for researchers who want to learn about current research methodologies and how to write a winning grant proposal.

JMIR Res Protoc creates an early scientific record for researchers who have developed novel methodologies, software, innovations or elaborate protocols.

JMIR Res Protoc provides a "dry-run" for peer-review of the final results paper, and allows feedback/critique of the methods, often while they still can be fixed.

JMIR Res Protoc faciliates subsequent publication of results demonstrating that the methodology has already been reviewed, and reduces the effort of writing up the results, as the protocol can be easily referenced.

JMIR Res Protoc demonstrates to reviewers of subsequent results papers that authors followed and adhered to carefully developed and described a-priori methods.

Studies whose protocols or grant proposals have been accepted in JMIR Res Protoc are "in principle accepted" for subsequent publication of results in other JMIR journals as long as authors adhere to their original protocol - regardless of study results (even if they are negative), reducing publication bias in medicine.

Authors publishing their protocols in JMIR Res Protoc will receive a 20% discount on the article processing fee if they publish their results in another journal of the JMIR journal family (for example, JMIR for ehealth studies, i-JMR for others).

JMIR Res Protoc is also a unique crowdfunding platform, allowing backers to crowdfund carefully peer-reviewed projects that are not junk-science, and giving researchers additional small funding to conduct and publish their research results. Each article is published with a crowdfunding widget, allowing readers to make nominal donations to the project, which benefit the authors (currently in beta).

Need more reasons? Read the Knowledge Base article on "Why should I publish my protocol/grant proposal"!

 

Recent Articles

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RCTs - Protocols/Proposals (eHealth)

Sleep disturbances post concussion have been associated with more frequent and severe concussion symptoms and may contribute to poorer recovery. Cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) is an effective treatment for insomnia; however, it remains unclear if this treatment method is effective in improving sleep outcomes and reducing concomitant postconcussion symptoms.

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RCTs - Protocols/Proposals (non-eHealth)

Seasonal malaria chemoprevention (SMC) is a highly effective community-based intervention to prevent malaria infections in areas where the malaria burden is high and transmission occurs mainly during the rainy season. In Africa, so far, SMC has been implemented in the Sahel region. Mozambique contributes 4% of the global malaria cases, and malaria is responsible for one-quarter of all deaths in the country. Based on recommendations in the Malaria Strategic Plan, the Malaria Consortium, in partnership with the National Malaria Control Programme in Mozambique, initiated a phased SMC implementation study in the northern province of Nampula. The first phase of this 2-year implementation study was conducted in 2020-2021 and focused on the feasibility and acceptability of SMC. The second phase will focus on demonstrating impact. This paper describes phase 2 of the implementation study.

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RCTs - Protocols/Proposals (funded, already peer-reviewed, non-eHealth)

Chronic pain and access to care are identified as critical needs of the Veterans Health Administration. Music imagery and music listening interventions have shown promise as effective nonpharmacological options for pain management. However, most studies have focused on acute pain, passive music experiences, and in-person delivery.

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Systematic Review Protocols

In individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), anxiety and depression contribute to increased mortality and exacerbations, decreased physical functioning, and deteriorated health-related quality of life. The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) is a patient-reported tool developed to measure symptoms of anxiety and depression in clinical settings. The HADS has been frequently used with individuals with COPD; however, its measurement properties lack critical appraisal in this population.

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RCTs - Protocols/Proposals (funded, already peer-reviewed, eHealth)

The World Health Organization recommends 150 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity (PA), which translates to approximately 7000 to 10,000 steps per day for adults. In Germany, less than half of the population in this age range meets this recommendation, highlighting the need for population-based intervention approaches for promoting daily PA.

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NIH funded proposals with peer-review reports (USA)

There is a high prevalence of skin diseases sub-Saharan Africa, including skin neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) that could lead to lifelong disabilities and deformities if not diagnosed and treated early. To achieve early detection and early treatment of these skin diseases, we developed a mobile health app, eSkinHealth.

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RCTs - Protocols/Proposals (eHealth)

The use of validated instruments means providing health professionals with reliable and valid tools. The Nurses’ Global Assessment of Suicide Risk (NGASR) scale has proven to be valid and reliable in supporting the nursing evaluation of suicide risk in different languages and cultural environments.

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Non-randomized Protocols and Methods (ehealth)

Patient-reported outcomes—symptoms, treatment side effects, and health-related quality of life—are important to consider in chronic illness care. The increasing availability of health IT to collect patient-reported outcomes and integrate results within the electronic health record provides an unprecedented opportunity to support patients’ symptom monitoring, shared decision-making, and effective use of the health care system.

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Systematic Review Protocols

Population growth and aging have highlighted the need for more effective home and prehospital care. Interconnected medical devices and applications, which comprise an infrastructure referred to as the Internet of Medical Things (IoMT), have enabled remote patient monitoring and can be important tools to cope with these demographic changes. However, developing IoMT platforms requires profound knowledge of clinical needs and challenges related to interoperability and how these can be managed with suitable technologies.

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RCTs - Protocols/Proposals (eHealth)

Mental health issues among emerging adults (aged 19-25 years) on a global scale have underscored the need to address their widespread experiences of depression and anxiety. As a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, emerging studies are being directed toward the development and deployment of digital peer emotional disclosure and support for the psychological well-being of emerging adults. However, it is important to explore the implementation and clinical effectiveness, as well as associated mechanisms of change, for optimal approaches in conducting digital peer support interventions for emerging adults’ psychological well-being.

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CIHR funded proposals with peer-review reports (Canada)

Caring for the well-being of older adults is one of the greatest challenges in modern societies. Improving the quality of care and life for older adults and the work lives of their care providers calls for effective knowledge translation of evidence-based best practices.

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RCTs - Pilots/Feasibility Studies (eHealth)

Several studies have shown that individuals with intellectual disabilities (IDs) have low levels of physical activity (PA), and intervention studies on PA suggest inconsistent evidence. The use of technology as a means of motivation for PA has yet to be extensively explored and needs to be further investigated.

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Preprints Open for Peer-Review

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Open Peer Review Period:

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